Macrophotography

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Photo from: Shaw Academy

Macro photography is the art of bringing small subjects to larger size while showing tremendous amounts of detail. A 50-60mm lens is suitable for general macro work but a longer lens range may be needed when trying to capture more skittish subjects like butterflies.fly

Photo by: Regayip Kocak

Extension tubes can be mounted between your lens and the camera body to help you focus more closely to your subject and create a much larger image. These tubes are a much cheaper alternative than macro lenses, but require more time to set up.

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Photo by: Micael Widell

Select a high aperture setting (between f/16 – f/22) to get the most out of your available depth of field and make your images look all around sharper. Alternatively, a lower aperture setting (between f/2.8 – f/4) to show less sharpness but make your subject pop against an out of focus background. The image above on the left was taken at f/2.8 and the one on the right was taken at f/22.

By John Kyritsis
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Kinetic Photography

Kinetic photography is an alternative form of light painting. Instead of drawing with the light itself, it relies mostly on the motion of the camera and a long exposure to produce the image. Usually this results in throwing the camera up into the air to get the desired effect.

While many people would cringe by having to throw their camera in the air, the outcome can be quite cool.

To achieve this photo you first want to make sure you have your camera strap securely around your wrist. Make sure your shutter speed is adjusted to the length of the toss. Make sure you have it in a dark space to allow for the lights to show up. Don’t be afraid to experiment with your light source and how you toss your camera to get different effects.

By: Jana Ruark

Source: Kinetic Photography: Techniques and Stunning Examples

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Flour Photography

Flour photography shows the motion and action in a photo. Many photographers use flour to capture the grace in the movements of dancers. In addition to flour, powdered paints can be used to add dimension and color to photographs.

Some key points to achieve this cool look is lighting and of course camera settings. It’s important to have lights in the back and also the front of the subject, similar to three point lighting, of the photo to pick up on the flour in the air. Preferably a single colored dark background should be used to contrast the whiteness of the flour. As for camera settings, it’s important to have a high shutter speed to freeze the action of the flour in the air.

Of course, it is highly recommended to have  a broom nearby to help clean up the mess from the flour.

By: Jana Ruark

Source: How to shoot photos of dancers and flour

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Breaking down Robert Capa’s Famous Quote

Robert Capa, a Hungarian photographer famous for his combat and adventure photography once said, “If your pictures aren’t good enough, you’re not close enough.” Originally, photographers thought this meant that high quality photos could only be captured when close to your subject, but as time went on people started interpreting the saying in different ways.

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Photograph by Gerda Taro

Not only can you be physically close to a subject, but optically close. Wide angle lenses allow photographers to capture subjects in a way that can shows a lot more context. On the flipside, telephoto lenses isolate the subject and put space between it and the photographer. In turn, this puts space between the subject and the viewer of the photograph.

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Photograph by Robert Capa

Being close to the subject also helps put the viewer within the scene. Cropping your photo how you want while on location saves on postproduction time and helps photographers understand what is truly happening in front of them. Getting closer also helps viewers become emotionally invested in the photo and makes them feel a part of the subjects’ life. Shots like these are prominent in documentary work.

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Photograph by Robert Capa

 

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Architectural Photography

Architectural photography is the art of taking pictures of different types of buildings and architecture. Interesting architecture that is commonly photographed are modern buildings and older castle-like buildings.

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Photograph by http://rthjabar.info/modern-architectural-photography/h/

Because there are so many photos of popular buildings, its important to try different angles when pursuing architectural photography to make your photos stand out.

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Photograph by http://javedchaudhry.net/architectural-photography/trend-architectural-photography-identico/

A crucial element to photographing architecture is to do it during different times of day. Sometimes the lighting around a building can have different effects on the building itself.

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Photograph by http://www.photographymad.com/pages/view/guide-to-architectural-photography

Written by Shelby Hart

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Infrared Photography

Infrared light is light that is not visible to the naked human eye. When you take a normal picture, the camera is capturing the visible light that you’re aiming at. Infrared photography involves taking a picture of only the infrared light that you’re aiming at.

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Photograph by Jack Seikaly

A DSLR camera can be made to take infrared photography. An internal filter must be replaced with an infrared light filter witch blocks out light from the visible spectrum. After taking a picture with this method it will appear overly red or pink; it must be processed in photoshop with white balance and slight color alterations.

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Photograph by http://www.natashaivanco.com/page/aboutir/

After processing, the scenery is more crips and dramatic. Vegetation will appear white or pink, the color of the sky will be more vibrant, skin will be smooth and milky in color and any extra veins or shadows will make people look more dramatic.

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Photograph by Arnaldo de Araujo B.S.

 

Written by Shelby Hart

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Understanding Golden Hour

We all know that light is the key element in photography art.

The Golden Hour sometimes called the “Magic Hour” is a period in the first hour after sunrise and last hour before sunset. In this unique time of day, when the sun is just above the horizon, sunlight travels through a greater depth of the atmosphere, reducing the intensity of the direct light, in consequence of which all objects are painted in golden-red light.

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Photo by www.iamlivingit.com

A professional photographer or even beginner can take magic photographs using this time of the day properly.

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Photo by iso.500px.com

When it comes to taking great photos, timing is everything. Today, when technology is developing so fast, you can plan your next shoot with the Golden Hour App.

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Photo by http://www.gizmodo.co.uk

Written by Olesya Kochegura 

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