Microphotography: it’s the small stuff

hoverfly1.jpg

“Detail of the head of a large Hoverfly. Magnification  4, f/14, ISO 100 and 1/250 sec.  Canon 7D, Canon macro lens MP-E 65mm/f2.8 and Canon macro Twin Lite Flash MT-E 24EX”

Microphotography is the extreme form of macro photography, dedicated to the photography of small objects from life-size to modest enlargements of up to about 20.

Microphotography is used as a more obsessive way to capture the most minuscule detail, on already tiny objects. One of the most popular thing to capture in micro is insects. Bugs, are pretty little to begin with, but even their tiny antenna and feelers have interesting patterns and unique qualities that can make a photo really interesting.

This technique also makes these tiny insects look larger than life. A form of art that can be really attractive to bug lovers, si-fi geeks, or artist who are amused by the natural patterns and colors of the honey bee.

cuckoo_wasp

“Common Cuckoo Wasp standing on a small flower petal.  Magnification  4, f/14, ISO 100 and 1/250 sec. Canon 7D, Canon macro lens MP-E 65mm/f2.8 and Canon macro Twin Lite Flash MT-E 24EX”

Magnification is used to describe the relationship between the actual size of the subject and the size of its image on the camera sensor.  Photographing a  3 cm (1.18 inch) long blue-tailed damselfly so that its image size is 1 cm (0.39 inch) on the sensor means that the magnification is 1/3 (1:3) life-size.  Dividing the size of the subject’s image on the sensor by the actual size determines the magnification.

Most macro lenses are maximally able to capture a 1:1 life-size image of a subject on the camera’s sensor.  Strictly speaking, a lens is categorized as a macro lens only if it can achieve this 1:1 magnification.  Microphotography can be undertaken by normal macro lenses equipped with modestly specialized equipment.  A lens’ minimum focusing distance is the closest distance your macro lens will allow you to get to your subject while still maintaining sharp focus. By adding a teleconverter, an even greater magnification can be achieved.  Application of a 2x teleconverter produces a maximum magnification of 4 and 2 stops loss in light intensity.  Adding more glass means a drop in quality and quantity of light transmission, the extent of which depends on the quality of the particular teleconverter you’re using.

finaldest

In the end microphotography magnifies the image to a larger than life size, more so than macro. This technique produces really interesting images.

tachina_fly.jpg

“Side view of a Tachina Fly.  Magnification  4, f/14, ISO 100 and 1/250 sec.  Canon 7D, Canon macro lens MP-E 65mm/f2.8 and Canon macro Twin Lite Flash MT-E 24EX.”

-mbennett

Source:

http://www.apogeephoto.com/sept2011/hdewaard92011.shtml

Photos by : bio_picture.jpg

Huub de Waard, a Dutch amateur photographer, specialized in microphotography.

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