Monthly Archives: October 2015

The Photography of Man Ray

Le violon d'Ingres, 1924

Le violon d’Ingres, 1924

Man Ray, the surrealist artist that rose to prominence in the 1920’s, worked in nearly every medium imaginable. He did everything from painting a pair of disembodied lips (Observatory Time The Lovers,1936) to creating a film where a women’s eyeball was sliced open (Un Chien De Andalou, 1929). One notable area of Man Ray’s vast catalog of work is his photography.

woman-with-long-hair-1929.jpg!Blog

Woman With Long Hair, 1929

“I do not photograph nature. I photograph my visions, ” Man Ray once  said, referring to his surreal aesthetic. To create that surreal effect. He often used techniques like double exposure, combination printing and cropping to create his photographs. However,Man Ray’s favorite technique was solarization. Solarization involves exposing a photograph to white light during the development process. The result is a photograph that is extremely overexposed. Solarization was a known phenomenon in photography before Man Ray used it, but it was considered a mistake rather than a methodology. Man Ray is often considered the first photographer to intentionally use solarization for artistic purposes.

solarisation 1931

Solarisation, 1931

primacy-of-matter-over-thought-1929.jpg!Blog

Primacy of Matter over Thought, 1929

Man Ray also created a new type of image called a “Rayogramme” or “Rayograph”. The creation of these images involved photographic paper but did not involve a camera.Photographic paper would have object laid directly on it and be exposed to light. Then, the image would be developed. As a result, a silhouette of the object would appear on the paper.

Rayograph (The Kiss), 1922

Rayograph (The Kiss), 1922

Photography was Man Ray’s most successful artistic venture. He even did commercial work for major magazines including Harper’s Bazaar.

Sources:

By Grace Hetfield

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Making Nightmares Come To Life

Photography is not just a medium for documenting realities. It can also be used to stage surreal images. Photographer Arthur Tress took the latter approach in the late 60’s and early 70’s when he created a photo series titled “Daymares”. The project started out as simply photographing local children playing in parks along Manhattan’s waterfront area. Then, Tress was invited to a children’s educational workshop where the students were making paintings based on their dreams. This inspired him to talk to children about their nightmares and recreate the scenarios in photographs. The results offer a haunting glimpse into the imagination of a child.

Child Buried In The Sand, Coney Island 1968

Child Buried In The Sand, Coney Island 1968

Boy With Root Hands, New York, 1971

Boy With Root Hands, New York, 1971

Tress has stated that “the purpose of these dream photographs is to show how the child’s creative imagination is constantly transforming his existence into magical symbols for unexpressed states of feeling or being.”

Flood Dream, Ocean City, New Jersey 1971

Flood Dream, Ocean City, New Jersey 1971

Boy In The Snow, New York 1970

Boy In The Snow, New York 1970

More photos from “Daymares”, as well as work from throughout his career, can be seen at his website.

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By Grace Hetfield

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Disposable cameras are a convenient way to take photographs at a cheap price. They serve the purpose of taking a certain amount of pictures for a singular time. The one-time-use cameras are typically used in situations when it is inconvenient or dangerous to have an expensive camera around. Most use a fixed-focus-lens and have flash.

A company called Photo-Pac produced a cardboard camera beginning in 1949 which shot 8 exposures and which was mailed-in for processing. It cost $1.29 and was an inexpensive way to shoot photos. The currently familiar disposable camera was developed by Fujifilm in 1986. Their Utsurun-Desu or QuickSnap line used 35 mm film, while Eastman Kodak’s 1987 Fling was based on 110 film Kodak released a 35 mm version in 1988, and in 1989 renamed the 35 mm version the FunSaver and discontinued the 110 Fling.

Disposable cameras have many uses. Today they are used as wedding favors, tourism, under-water photography, and “accident kit cameras.” They are also used by some photographers for artistic purposes because of the cameras simplistic shooting methods.

Disposable cameras have become a relic in the world of photography. I have not personality used one in probably 10 years. I like many others have replaced the disposable cameras with the camera built into my phone, but I still think of disposable cameras when I think of first taking pictures.

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disposable_camera

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Charlie Waite

blog 1Charlie Waite is now one of the leading landscape photographers in the world. He was born in 1949 and spent the first 10 years of his professional career working in British theater and television. While working in British theater he became fascinated with theatrical lighting and design and gradually the landscape and the way it can be revealed to us through light and shade stole him away from the acting profession.
Charlie Waite’s style is unique in that the way he photographs landscapes conveys a sense of calm and serenity. Because of these unique photographs and his approach, he has established a reputation world wide. He has lectured throughout the UK, US, and Europe. He’s held exhibitions all over the world including London, Tokyo, and California. Waite has given and continues to give tuition to amateur, professional and aspiring photographers of all ages from the UK, Australia, Europe and the US which he hugely enjoys. In early 2007 he was presented with Amateur Photography’s Power of Photography award, which is given to a photographer whose work is deemed to effectively demonstrate the powerful and memorable images of which photography is capable.
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Originally I was going to do my presentation on Charlie Waite but I couldn’t find much information on him other that what I’ve put here so I went with Joyce tenneson. I love his style of photography because you really do feel a sense of calm and serenity when you look at his photographs. It’s such a unique style of photography. Landscape photography is something I really love and his particular style really grabbed my attention.blog 4

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Check out his website and gallery here: http://www.charliewaite.com/gallery

-kerickson

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Mitakon Speedmaster

The Chinese company ZY Optics just opened up pre-orders for quite an unusual lens. It’s a Mitakon Speedmaster 135mm f/1.4 that boasts one of the largest apertures you’ll find for the focal length. It’ll also be quite expensive and extremely rare: the price tag is a hefty $2,999, and less than 100 units will ever be made.

The lens include a minimum focusing distance of 1.6m (~5.25ft), 11 elements in 5 groups, an 11-blade aperture, a clickless aperture ring, a 105mm filter thread, and a weight of 3kg (~6.6lb).

The lens is very unique and is going to be a collector’s item. This one of kind lens will be able to take one-of-a-kind pictures from a distance but still having extreme focus on a singular area.

http://www.zyoptics.net/

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The Impossible Project

The Impossible Project was founded in 2008 when Dr. Florian Kaps, André Bosman and Marwan Saba purchased the last factory producing Polaroid instant film. Their goal in creating The Impossible Project was to save 200 million cameras from becoming useless. Edwin Land, the founder of Polaroid and the inventor of the world’s first instant camera and film, once said “Don’t undertake a project unless it’s manifestly important and nearly impossible.” The founders of The Impossible Project took him at his word when they begun their journey.blog 1

Two years later, they began producing their own re-formulated versions of classic Polaroid instant film formats for the SX-70, 600, and Image/Spectra cameras, as well as larger 8×10 format film, at plants in Enschede, the Netherlands, and Monheim, Germany.

Today, The Impossible Project is no longer a project but a fast growing company. Its core products remain analog instant film, refurbished Polaroid cameras, as well as its own-designed range of analog instant cameras including the Instant Lab Universal. At its creative headquarters in Berlin, they continue to redesign analog photography for a digital generation.blog 2Through the Impossible Project’s funding they’ve saved 200 million cameras. They refurbished 27,000 cameras and produced and sold 1,000,000 films in 2014 alone. They have two factories that produce fiproject.comlm for Polaroid and Impossible cameras. There are 35 film varieties produced by Impossible.blog 3

I stumbled upon this website researching polaroid cameras because that was my original idea for my blog entry and I had no idea this company existed. I love that they work so hard to revive something that so many people thought was outdated and continue to refurbish old Polaroid cameras and create new film for them and new ways to keep this type of photography alive, like the Instant Lab Universal which allows you to print directly from your phone a photo in polaroid format.

You can check out their website here: https://www.the-impossible

-kerickson

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Tim Tadder

Wigs made of water. These works of art were done by commercial photographer and visual communicator, Tim Tadder. He creates various types of photographic works and has worked for many companies such as, Adidas, Craftsman and Gatorade. I thought his series called “Water Wigs” was interesting. Tim started out at a young age. His first showing was at his school library which included black and white photographs he took of a professional skateboarder. Using his father’s work room, he developed all of his photos that he displayed at the showing.

When I saw some photographs called “water wigs”, where people who appeared to be bald had artistic hair styles or some form of décor that adorned their heads created by using water, I thought hmm! What was more interesting was how he created these wig of water. In an interview with Huffing Post, Tim briefly explains how he creates these works of art.

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In an article “Tim Tadder’s Photo Series “Water Wigs” Captures Beautiful Intersection Of Baldness And Water Balloons” (2012) stated that, “we used long skinny balloons to create the shapes; we would place them on the subjects heads and pop them from areas where you could not see the balloon (ie. the parts hidden off frame or behind them.) So actually there are two methods happening, one throwing balloons to create the explosions and placing the balloons on the heads and popping them out of view of the camera.” The models he uses have good sportsmanship and plenty of facial expressions to help bring excitement to these artistic shots.

His inspiration for “Water Wigs” came from his love for the movie “Flash Dance” and the excitement he gets from being weird.  He uses various form of lighting equipment, modifiers to camera and lens and of course, Adobe Photoshop software. Follow the links to look at some of his other photographic works.

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By pstarkey

Sources:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/08/24/tim-tadders-photo-series-_n_1828601.html?utm_hp_ref=arts

http://www.timtadder.com/About/Bio/1

http://www.photoshop.com/spotlights/tim-tadder

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