f/64

     f/64 was an ultra-exclusive photography group that was founded in the early 1930’s by Ansel Adams and Willard van Dyke. It consisted of 7 members: Ansel Adams , Willard Van Dyke, Imogen Cunningham, John Paul Edwards, Sonya Noskowiak, Henry Swift, and Edward Weston.

     Many of the members were related in some way; either by friendship or apprenticeship, or in the case of Sonya Noskowiak and Edward Weston, romance. They came together by way of a shared philosophy on the composition photographic images. They group as a whole believed that photography should show as much detail and as great a depth of field as possible for the subject matter at hand.

In 1933 Adams wrote the following for Camera Craft magazine:

“My conception of Group f/64 is this: it is an organization of serious photographers without formal ritual of procedure, incorporation, or any of the restrictions of artistic secret societies, Salons, clubs or cliques…The Group was formed as an expression of our desire to define the trend of photography as we conceive it…Our motive is not to impose a school with rigid limitations, or to present our work with belligerent scorn of other view-points, but to indicate what we consider to be reasonable statements of straight photography. Our individual tendencies are encouraged; the Group Exhibits suggest distinctive individual view-points, technical and emotional, achieved without departure from the simplest aspects of straight photographic procedure.”

Here is a link to f/64’s Manifesto:

http://kcbx.net/~mhd/1intro/f64.htm

Ansel Adams

Sonya Noskowiak

Edward Weston

https://i1.wp.com/katarzynaperlak.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/tattoos-08-785x829.jpgImogen Cunningham

Willard Van Dyke

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