Monthly Archives: February 2013

Nashville Effect

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The Nashville effect is very simple and easy to accomplish. It is an effect that a person can use in Instagram and on some iPhones. This effect can give an old washed out picture effect or a nice effect that many might see on some commercials for vacation or western landscape advertisements.

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Tim Flach is known for taking Stunning Animal Photography.  He was known first for his pictures of horses and dogs.

His latest project, entitled More Than Human, consists of intimate studio portraits of various wild animals, monkeys, tigers, elephants, birds, bats, cute pandas and specially bred featherless chickens.

Mr. Flach graduated from the famous St. Martins School of Art in London and he spent almost 20 years working taking photos for advertising. He has working career in Adidas, Cirque du Soleil, Jaguar and Sony. Recently he became known for his highly-stylized animal portraits. His masterpiece aims to capture the emotion animals evoke in humans. To make this possible, he brings his animal models into such close-up shots that the viewer begins to read the gestures and body language as we would a human being. His work has been widely recognized in the United Kingdom, United States and Far East and he has also lectured extensively around the world.

http://designhash.com/stunning-animal-photography-tim-flach/

 

 

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by | February 26, 2013 · 11:05 am

High Speed Photography, The World That is Gone to Quickly for Us to See

High speed photographs can provide a unique way to see things that happen every day but we don’t see because our eyes and brains cannot process the image quickly enough. At 1/1000th of a second of less, an entirely unique world appears. A lot of high speed photos are fairly overdone and uninspiring, search for “High speed photography”, and you will find a million similar pictures of bullets hitting fruit. The better ones take a bit more thought, and good lighting is vital to a good high-speed shot, to ensure both the clarity and exposure of the image, since at less than 1/1000th of a second, you need a lot of light.

Balloon mid pop shot with noise triggered flash
This is a fairly generic photo of a popping balloon, but it’s interesting because of the way it was taken. Rather than attempt to take the photo with perfect timing, the photographer used a long exposure and a sound-activated flash.
Splash & Tiramisu
This is a photo that shows a lot of though. It has a low depth of field, and it tells a bit of a short story because you can see on the left the fork may have been thrown off the plate by whatever caused the coffe to fly into the air.
Quarters hitting water
Not much to say about this one, I just really like it.
Cornstarch-filled balloon
This is another clever idea added to the classic balloon-popping picture. The balloon has cornstarch in it, which creates a very visually interesting cloudy effect. You can also see the importance of good lighting in this photo, had the lighting not been bright, it wouldn’t have had sharp edges on the cornstarch cloud.
High-Speed shower
Water looks very different in a high-speed photo. Here you can clearly see the individual droplets as well as the light glistening on several of them. This photo also looks nice because of the shadowing.
AA battery through glass
A wine glass being broken by a thrown battery. You could probably read into this, but the flying glass and water together makes a visually interesting picture.

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A Brief History of Nikon

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Nikon was founded in 1917 when three of Japan’s most prominent optics manufacturers joined together to form Nippon Kogaku K.K. Though Nikon is most notable today for its wide range of cameras, the first products to roll off of their production lines were binoculars (4x and 6x), microscopes and telescopes. 

                As early as 1932, Nikon was marketing its camera lenses under the Nikkor designation; though it would be another fourteen years before it began to use the name Nikon for its small cameras in 1946. Nikon’s first commercially produced camera, the Nikon I, became available in 1948 and thanks to its success, Nikon had become such a hit that in 1950 the New York Times featured an article singing the praises of Nikon and “introducing the superior features of Nikon cameras and Nikkor lenses to the world.”

    Image            In 1959 Nikon released its first SLR model which “incorporated a number of world-first features, such as an exposure meter fully coupled with aperture and the practical application of a motor drive.”

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Fast forward to 1986; after the 1983 success of the Nikon “One-touch” (their first compact camera with autofocus), Nikon releases their first SLR with autofocus, the Nikon F-501.

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By 1995 Nikon was manufacturing its first true digital SLRs and in 1999 they released the D1; the precursor to DSLRs that we all know and love today. The D1 sported a whopping 2.7 mega-pixel sensor and weighed in at just under two and a half pounds without a lens.  All that digital goodness could be yours for only $5,580!!

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– gkittell

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Benjamin Heine by Raven Neubert

Benjamin Heine is a painter, illustrator, and a photographer.  He is from Belgian but was born in Abidjan, Ivory Coast.  He currently lives and works in Brussels. 

Heine takes his own photos and then takes a “scrap” piece of paper and draws what he wants to be in the picture. He then takes a picture, of him holding the drawing, over his original picture.

I cannot draw, but I hope that someone who can may try out this technique.  It is very interesting and seems complicated.ImageImageImage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://cubeme.com/blog/2010/05/27/pencil-vs-camera-hybrid-works-of-drawing-photo-art-by-benjamin-heine/

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Seldom Seen: The World of Macro Photography

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Macro photography (or photomacrography or macrography, and sometimes macrophotography) is extreme close-up photography, usually of very small subjects, in which the size of the subject in the photograph is greater than life size. By some definitions, a macro photograph is one in which the size of the subject on the negative or image sensor is life size or greater. In order to achieve the macro effect, the distance between the lens and the camera sensor must be increased. There are several options available to those who wish to pursue macro photography.

First, if you have sufficient disposable income, you could simply buy a specialized macro lens. The upside to this is that aside from now having the macro capability, some micro lenses are made to focus to infinity enabling them to serve as your everyday lens as well. The downside is that a macro lens can set you back a few hundred dollars. The second option is to purchase some focusing tubes. These are simply hollow tubes that are inserted in between the body of the camera and the lens to increase the distance between the sensor and lens. The effect should be very close if not exactly the same as with a dedicated macro lens and you will save yourself a heap of money. A good set of focusing rings runs anywhere from $75 to $125 as opposed to around $400 for a brand new macro lens.

Macro photography allows us to see into a world we seldom stop and think about. So often we take everything we see at face value. With macro photography we can see past that. I have always enjoyed learning about how things work. When I was young I was constantly taking things apart to see what was on the inside. For me macro photography is kind of the same because it allows you to see what something really looks like and how it’s put together.

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gkittell

For more info please go to:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macro_photography

http://photo.net/learn/macro/

http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/macro-photography-intro.htm

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Trash the Dress

“Trash the dress”, also known as “fearless bridal” or “rock the frock”, is a style of wedding photography that contrasts elegant clothing with an environment in which it is out of place. It is generally shot in the style of fashion or glamour photography. Such photography often takes place on a beach, but other locations include city streets, rooftops, garbage dumps, fields, and abandoned buildings. The bride often wears a ball gown, prom dress or wedding dress, and may effectively ruin the dress in the process by getting it wet, dirty or in extreme circumstances tearing or destroying the garment.

Some sources claim that the trend was originally started in 2001 by Las Vegas wedding photographer John Michael Cooper,[1] however, the idea of destroying a wedding dress has been used in Hollywood symbolically since at least October 1998 when Meg Cummings of the show Sunset Beach ran into the ocean in her wedding dress after her wedding was interrupted.

On 26 August 2012, during a photo shoot at the Ouareau River in Rawdon, Quebec, Canada, Maria Pantazopoulos, a 30-year-old Montreal bride drowned[2] when the dress she was wearing dragged her downstream. The photographer, as well as others, tried to help but were unable to rescue her. Her body was later recovered by a scuba diver.

I have always wanted to do this with an old prom dress just because it looks fun. It’s something completely different and gives you a whole new way of looking at the pictures. You have pictures from a prom or wedding where everything is just perfect. Then you get to have fun with mud, paint, and soaking it in water with trash the dress pictures. Your personality comes out and you get to do what you want. The two picures side-by-side would be interesting to look at as well. Overall, I just think these are really neat and it allows the people in the pictures to just be themselves and have fun.

Hawaii-Wedding-Photographer-Trash-The-Dress-blog trash_the_dress TrashTheDress1_V2-585x391 Love and passion - kiss of married couple in water trash-the-wedding-dress-paint ttd

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trash_the_dress

-lhitch

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