Monthly Archives: March 2012

African Wildlife Photography.

I have always loved traveling, and a place I have always wanted to visit is Africa, and photograph the wildlife there. I found a photographer named Greg du Toit, he captures the beauty and danger of Africa’s wildlife and people. He is 8th generation African and has lived there all of his life, when he was younger he led safaris which allowed him to be very well known with the wildlife there. Recently he started doing an “African Photography Safari”, giving any type of photographer from amateur, to professional, a chance to photograph the animals in the bush.

His published works include some of the following, a solo exhibit entitled “Authentic Africa” hosted by National Geographic of Singapore in 2011, The Best Of Gateway Gallery, a book published every 10 years,’On Assignment’ photographic segment for Africa Geographic magazine, cover of the February 2012 issue of Africa Geographic magazine, two images place in the Smithsonian Nature’s Best photographic competition, a book on business philosophy used his ‘Blood, Sweat and Photographic Tears’ project to illustrate certain key business principles. The list is endless and you can look up more of his accomplishments on his website, http://www.gregdutoit.com/index.php

I have listed just a few of his photographs below, they are incredible and cannot be put into words. If anyone is interested in looking into more of his pictures or the “African Photography Safari”, his website is listed above. He also does a blog, if you would like to follow it, here is the link: http://www.gregdutoitblog.com/ 

I hope you enjoy his pictures as much as I do.

Here is Greg du Toit, waiting to photograph a lion drinking water:

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Greg outside his custom-built hide deep in the heart of Southern Tanzania (2007)

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A few of Greg du Toit’s wildlife photographs:

For the Chameleon and snake photograph, here is the settings and camera he used. 

Nikon D3s, Nikkor 200-400mm lens at 350mm, F8 1/2000 and ISO640. Beanbag for support.

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By: Jessica Cornwell.

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Cool bokeh ideas

I was blown away when Mosher showed us the bokeh tutorial. I found some more really interesting ideas on this site: http://shutterskills.com/make-your-own-bokeh-shape.html. I’m really anxious to try it! I think the one with the snowflakes is very interesting. It would be cool to use Christmas lights as a light source and have them shaped like snowflakes. I think we should all try it. Here are some cool ideas.

-Cassie Gotto

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Photo of the Day 3/30/12

I took this photo because I was intrigued that behind a bunch of bamboo there was a bright yellow birdcage thing. I worked on this a bit in Bridge under camera raw and boosted the blacks and upped the vibrance and contrast.

Camera settings f18-ISO6400-1/60

Time 11:19 am

Michelle Seymour

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Photographing Abandoned Buildings

When I’m not photographing sports one of my other favorite things to photograph is abandoned places.  To me they tell a story, why would somebody leave this place all alone for 10, 15, 20 or even 100 years? I found a great website that gives a bunch of tips when photographing abandoned places. One of the things they talk about is bringing a tripod.  I agree with them that this is crucial because these places are usually very low lit and need to be shot at a very low shutter speed.  Another tip they gave was to shoot wide in order to capture the entire place you are shooting.  The link below is the website that gave me all the tips.

http://www.digital-photography-school.com/how-to-photograph-abandoned-places

I’m not going to list all the tips for shooting in abandoned places because that is all covered in the posting on the website.  I think shooting abandoned places is really cool.  Many of the older building have really sweet architecture. Abandoned buildings that look really cool on the outside usually tell a whole different story inside.  In the picture shown with all the seats this could have once been an eloquent theater where rich people went, and now is left in ruins.  I think abandoned places create a whole different aspect of art that not many people take the time to appreciate.  To me these abandoned places are great you have the ability to capture the whole essence of the building in a single photograph and I think that gives all the merit to why  photographing abandoned places is worth the while.  Another thing I love about photographing abandoned places is the sense of adventure.  While these old places are downright cool they are creepy, you never know what could be hiding around the next corner.  For me while the photography aspect and taking the pictures is a lot of fun the adventure of finding these places and inspecting them is just as fun.

The pictures taken below are by a photograph Chris Folsom who wrote the article in the link i posted

Jsheridan11

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Photo of the Day 3/29/12

I took this photo yesterday of the inside of the tree my step dad cut down. It looks like termites have been feeding on the inside of it, and I though it looked pretty interesting on the inside. I did a few things to it in camera bridge with clarity, blacks, and recovery.

Camera settings f18-ISO6400-1/60

Time 11:21 am

Michelle Seymour

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Old Foes Home

Old Foes Home

I was on Memebase.com today, and I came across a really cool set of photos on there. It takes villains from various movies, and puts them into sad situations in their lives. I thought it was a pretty funny and clever idea that someone did. The photos are a .GIF file so if you, click on the photo to make it larger, and wait a few seconds it will go through a slide show of them. I enjoyed them, so I figured I would share it with everyone else.

Michelle Seymour

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Photo of the Day 3/28/12

I took this photo today outside, my step dad has recently cut down a dead tree in our yard. I thought that the fungus growing on it was interesting. The only thing I did to this photo was to darken the shadows to bring out the cracks in the bark, and boost the contrast to make the fungus stand out more.

Camera settings f18-ISO6400-1/640

Time: 12:28 pm

Michelle Seymour

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