How to use Aperature and F-Stops in Photography

“What is the aperture of our cameras? What is the use of setting a large or small one? Let’s dive into those mysterious numbers and find out what they mean. Think of the aperture as the opening of your lens. Light arrives and its photons are focused onto the sensor by the lens. The incoming analog signal gets then translated into digital numbers and written on the memory card.

Come to me....

"Come to me..." captured by Sean Nel

Typical F stop numbers are:

F1.4, F.1.8, F2, F2.8, F4, F5.6, F8, F11, F16, F22

As they get smaller, the opening in the lens gets larger. And vice versa.

Photo captured by Edgar Barany

The reason why this happens is because these numbers represent fractions of the diameter of the lens. For example F2 means that the entire diameter of the lens gets divided by 2. If we have a 50mm lens and we set F2 in the aperture settings, the opening of the lens will become 50/2 = 25mm. If now we set F4, the opening becomes 50mm/4=12.5mm. So setting a higher F number we obtained a smaller opening.”

Photo captured by Edgar Barany

I chose this article because my favorite shots that I like the most are those where the background is out of focus and the only thing in focus is your subject. This could be an idea I would like to use in my final project. To read the rest of this article click here http://www.picturecorrect.com/tips/how-to-use-aperture-and-f-stops-in-photography/

author: SSINGH

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1 Comment

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One response to “How to use Aperature and F-Stops in Photography

  1. Debbie Love

    This gives a great explanation of aperature. I love the photos displayed in this post!

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